Posts tagged with

Emergency Response Division (ERD)

Incident Responses for February 2019 alyssa.dillon Tue, 03/12/2019 - 12:00

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries, and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

This month OR&R responded to 17 incidents, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and hazardous material releases. Here are some of February’s notable incidents ...

The Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Scientist Catherine Berg

Posted Thu, 02/28/2019 - 13:41
By Donna L. Roberts, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Catherine Berg, a scientific support coordinator in OR&R’s Emergency Response Division.

December 2018 and January 2019 Incident Responses

Posted Fri, 02/08/2019 - 13:53

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries, and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

OR&R responded to 11 incidents in December and five incidents in January, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and a wellhead leak.

20 Years Ago: The Grounded Freighter That Never Reached its Destination

Posted Mon, 02/04/2019 - 14:29
By Doug Helton, Office of Response and Restoration

Twenty years ago, on Feb. 4, 1999, the 639 foot freighter New Carissa ran aground near Coos Bay, Oregon. The ship was destined to load wood chips to carry to Japan, but nature had another plan. The unladen freighter, riding high in the water (and therefore a huge sail area) dragged anchor. Attempts to get the vessel underway and back to sea failed and the swells and high winds drove the ship ashore.

Incident Responses for November 2018

Posted Tue, 12/04/2018 - 14:41

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries, and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

This month OR&R responded to 10 incidents, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and hazardous material releases ...

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Scientist and Supervisor Ed Levine

Posted Tue, 11/20/2018 - 12:25

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Ed Levine, a scientific support coordinator and supervisor in OR&R’s Emergency Response Division.

Go with the (Lava) Flow: OR&R Software Team Learns About Volcanic Hazmat Response

Posted Wed, 11/14/2018 - 14:06
By Kristen Faiferlick, Office of Response and Restoration

OR&R works with partners all over the U.S. to respond to all kinds of hazardous material (hazmat) emergencies. We’re always excited to learn from our partners about how they handle hazmat situations, from oil spills to hurricanes … and even lava flows.

Incident Responses for October 2018

Posted Fri, 11/09/2018 - 13:42

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries, and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

This month OR&R responded to 12 incidents, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and hazardous material releases.  

How the Ghosts of Shipwrecks Past Continue to Haunt U.S. Waters

Posted Wed, 10/31/2018 - 14:18
By Ellen Ramirez, National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, and Alyssa Gray, Office of Response and Restoration

OCT. 31, 2018 — Deep under the surface of U.S. waters, lying in wait to strike, is an environmental threat the size of an army. This army — while deadly and toxic in its own right — is not made up of soldiers and weapons, but rather of vessels from long ago, now derelict and forgotten.

Friends in High Places: How NOAA’s Satellite Analysis Branch Supports Oil Spill Response

Posted Thu, 10/18/2018 - 13:58
By Ellen Ramirez, National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service

When responding to an oil spill, it’s important to get a look at the spill from every possible angle — both from land, from sea, and even, from space. Oil spill response teams in federal and state governments face challenges in offshore surveillance, simply due to the lack of observations over open water (compared to land).

Deepwater Horizon is arguably the most high profile oil spill to have occurred in the U.S., but what’s little known is that dozens of small, human-caused oil discharges happen in U.S. waters every single day – and there are likely many more that go undetected and unreported.