Monthly Archives August 2019

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Marine Debris Program Gulf of Mexico Regional Coordinator Caitlin Wessel

Posted Tue, 08/27/2019 - 17:15
By Jennifer Simms, OR&R’s Marine Debris Program

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Caitlin Wessel, OR&R Marine Debris Program regional coordinator for the Gulf of Mexico.

Hollings Scholar Wraps Up Summer at NOAA with Story Map on ‘Building a Resilient Community’

Posted Tue, 08/20/2019 - 17:54

Working under NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration, 2019 Hollings scholar Leah Moore spent her summer working on the story map “Building a Resilient Community: NOAA’s Hazard Exposure and Risk Exploration (HERE) Tool” — a publicly available link will be available later this summer.

How OR&R Works to Preserve and Improve Water Quality through Restoration

Posted Fri, 08/16/2019 - 12:34

During National Water Quality Month, NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration shares some of the ways we preserve and improve water quality through cleanup and restoration. 

NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration develops scientific solutions to keep the coasts clean from threats of oil, hazardous waste, and marine debris — all of which are major pollutants that can hugely affect the water quality of our coastal natural resources. 

Incident Responses for July 2019

Posted Tue, 08/06/2019 - 12:35

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

This month OR&R responded to 10 incidents, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and a hazardous chemical spill. 

Assessing The Impacts of Pollution at the Hanford Nuclear Site

Posted Thu, 08/01/2019 - 13:10

Flowing through southeastern Washington is an approximately 50 mile stretch of the Columbia River known as the Hanford Reach. This unique section of the river is an important habitat for fish and wildlife, including Chinook salmon. This area also served as the birthplace of the atomic bomb at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.