Posts tagged with

Assessment and Restoration Division

Three Ways to Assess Marine Mammals During Oil Spills

Posted Tue, 01/21/2020 - 14:01

Since thousands of oil spills of varying sizes occur in U.S. waters each year, oil spill scientists must be prepared to respond to and assess the impacts of oil on marine mammals. To do this, the NOAA has published: "Guidelines for Assessing Exposure and Impacts of Oil Spills on Marine Mammals," which is available for the public on the NOAA Central Library website. These guidelines provide a review of considerations for marine mammals under NOAA's jurisdiction, incorporating knowledge gained from previous oil spills.

Using ESI Maps to Set Priorities in the Chaos of an Oil Spill

Posted Tue, 11/12/2019 - 16:41
By Megan Ewald and Tom Brosnan, Office of Response and Restoration

This week, we’re taking a closer look at what sensitivity mapping is, how it’s used, and why it’s so important. A snapshot of the resources in a specific area, sensitivity mapping can be a valuable tool both in and out of the spill response community. Our latest blog takes you through the process of using sensitivity mapping to prioritize response activities during an oil spill.

Rivers of the 'Dammed,' Rising from the Grave

Posted Thu, 10/31/2019 - 15:32
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

*A Halloween Spooky Science Story 

Once there were six waterways cursed by pollution. 

But terrifying toxins and oozing oil spills were not the first dooms to befall these rivers, each of them had already been dammed. The dams had been constructed for a variety of important reasons, but as the years passed and they fell out of use, an evil crept over them. 

Keystone Species Arctic Cod Extremely Sensitive to Oil Exposure

Posted Tue, 09/03/2019 - 22:40
By Dr. Sarah Allan, Office of Response and Restoration

Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) are small, ice-affiliated forage fish, that can make up more than 80% of all living fish in Arctic waters. Arctic cod have a circumpolar distribution that includes the Chukchi, Beaufort, and Bering seas in the Alaskan Arctic, and are a critical link in Arctic food webs. 

This keystone Arctic species is also particularly vulnerable to oil spills, which was the focus of a new study titled “Embryonic crude oil exposure impairs growth and lipid allocation in a keystone Arctic forage fish.”

Hollings Scholar Wraps Up Summer at NOAA with Story Map on ‘Building a Resilient Community’

Posted Tue, 08/20/2019 - 17:54

Working under NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration, 2019 Hollings scholar Leah Moore spent her summer working on the story map “Building a Resilient Community: NOAA’s Hazard Exposure and Risk Exploration (HERE) Tool” — a publicly available link will be available later this summer.

How OR&R Works to Preserve and Improve Water Quality through Restoration

Posted Fri, 08/16/2019 - 12:34

During National Water Quality Month, NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration shares some of the ways we preserve and improve water quality through cleanup and restoration. 

NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration develops scientific solutions to keep the coasts clean from threats of oil, hazardous waste, and marine debris — all of which are major pollutants that can hugely affect the water quality of our coastal natural resources. 

Story Map Now Live: NOAA Intern Looks Back on Summer Spent Learning About the Lower Duwamish River

Posted Thu, 07/11/2019 - 12:25
By Kavya Varkey, OR&R 2018 Summer Intern

This blog was written by Kavya Varkey, a high school student from the Seattle area who interned with OR&R in the summer of 2018. Kavya was instrumental in developing the new story map on the Lower Duwamish River Superfund site. An urban river with a history of industrial pollution that began in the 1900s, the Lower Duwamish River continues to undergo both cleanup and restoration efforts. To learn more, view the new story map here

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Physical Scientist Ben Shorr

Posted Tue, 06/18/2019 - 18:16
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Ben Shorr, a physical scientist in OR&R’s Assessment and Restoration Division.

Threats to Sea Turtles from Oil Spills: Lessons Learned During a Disaster

Posted Tue, 06/11/2019 - 18:16
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Few animals capture the human imagination like sea turtles. Sea turtles are living fossils, they have glided through the Earth’s oceans for over 110 million years. But today, sea turtles face new, human-caused threats that put all seven species at risk of extinction. One of these threats is oil spills.

The Anacostia River: Challenges and Opportunities for Outdoor Recreation in the Heart of Washington, DC

Posted Thu, 06/06/2019 - 14:34
By Erin Garnass-Holmes, ambassador to the Anacostia Watershed Urban Waters Partnership

The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., was a poster child for America’s degraded urban waterways. Years of industrial land use on the waterfront and floating trash scared many people away from recreating on or by the river. However, in recent years local advocates, government agencies, and water utilities have made great strides in restoring this urban river