Floating Bioassays: New Tool Helps Track and Assess Toxicity in Oil Spills

Posted Thu, 04/15/2021 - 15:31
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

At first glance, the blue surface of the open ocean seems like an empty place. But if you look closely, life teems just beneath the surface. Tiny, transparent fish eggs, larval invertebrates, and other planktonic organisms float and drift at the mercy of wind and ocean currents. 

Dolphin Discoveries in the Decade Since Deepwater Horizon

Posted Wed, 04/14/2021 - 20:30
By Teri Rowles, Lori Schwacke (National Marine Mammal Foundation), and Megan Ewald

From March 30 to April 20, tune in as we go back in time to the day of our country’s largest marine oil spill, what’s happened since then, and how we’re better prepared for future spills. In our latest blog, learn more about the research and discoveries that have been made about dolphins since Deepwater Horizon.

Restoration for the Rising Tide

Posted Fri, 04/09/2021 - 13:19
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

This week, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this blog, learn more about the different types of restoration used to help recover from and mitigate the impacts of severe storm events, and coastal pollution. 

Building Back Better: Integrating Risk Reduction into Recovery with Nature-Based Solutions

Posted Tue, 04/06/2021 - 22:33
By Autumn Lotze, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

This week, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this blog, learn more about how building back better after disasters can help prevent future impacts. 

How Will Climate Change, New Technologies, and Shifting Trade Patterns Affect Global Shipping?

Posted Tue, 04/06/2021 - 14:13
This is a guest post by University of Washington graduate students Megan Desillier, Seth Sivinski, and Nicole White.

This week, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this flashback guest blog from our partners at the University of Washington, learn more about how the opening up of a new trade route in the Arctic brings with it new risks. 

A Sense of Urgency in the Bering Sea

Posted Mon, 04/05/2021 - 14:29
By Davin Holen, Alaska Sea Grant, University of Alaska Fairbanks

This week, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this guest blog, Alaska Sea Grant is a coastal community resilience specialist Davin Holen writes about the impacts climate change has on native communities in Alaska.

Living Shorelines: A Sound Investment

Posted Thu, 04/01/2021 - 14:09
By Daniel Hayden, Restore America’s Estuaries

Over the next two weeks, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this guest blog from Restore America's Estuaries President and CEO Daniel Hayden, learn more about how living shorelines can be used to help protect against the impacts of sea level rise and coastal erosion.

How NOAA Supports Post-Storm Coral Restoration

Posted Thu, 04/01/2021 - 12:56
By Alyssa Gray, Office of Response and Restoration

As the Earth’s atmosphere and ocean continue to warm under the global threat of climate change, the future of coral reefs looks bleaker than ever before. With rising temperatures comes an increase in mass coral bleaching events, infectious disease outbreaks, and the process known as ocean acidification. Climate change not only affects the overall health of corals, it also impacts their resiliency. Changes to the frequency and intensity of tropical storms — another side effect of climate change — lead to storm seasons that do a massive amount of damage to coral reefs.