Posts tagged with

Deepwater Horizon/BP

Sea Grant Team Releases Pair of Publications Detailing Deepwater Horizon Oil Fate

Posted Mon, 05/07/2018 - 16:55
By Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium

The Sea Grant oil spill outreach team has produced two new publications outlining what scientists know about the fate of that oil in the Gulf of Mexico environment. Those documents, Where did the oil go? A Deepwater Horizon fact sheet and Microbes and oil: What’s the connection? can both be viewed and downloaded at https://gulfseagrant.org/oilspilloutreach/publications/.

Deepwater Horizon: Another Year Gone By, What’s Changed?

Posted Thu, 04/19/2018 - 18:42
By Alyssa Dillon, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration

Eight years ago today, on April 20, 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon Macondo oil well drilling platform tragically killed 11 workers, and started the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, releasing millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico.

Remote Sensing During Deepwater Horizon Brings to Light the Importance of Surface Oil in Oil Spill Response and Assessment

Posted Tue, 02/13/2018 - 13:21
By Alyssa Dillon, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration

This blog covers information that will be presented by NOAA Office of Response and Restoration Senior Scientist Lisa DiPinto at the AAAS Conference this week. To check out other presentation topics, visit the AAAS Conference website.

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Impacts on Gulf of Mexico Shorelines and Nearshore Areas

Posted Sun, 08/27/2017 - 19:06

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in significant environmental harm over a large area of the Gulf of Mexico and adjacent shorelines.

A special issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series published Aug. 3, 2017, features 9 scientific articles summarizing the impacts of the oil spill on northern Gulf of Mexico shorelines and nearshore areas.  The scientific studies, conducted by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration authors and partners, document four key findings based on five years of data collection and study.

Closing Down Damage Assessment After Deepwater Horizon

Posted Wed, 04/05/2017 - 19:28
By Greg Baker

The environmental toll from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster was enormous, demanding a massive deployment of people and materials to measure the adverse effects.

Federal and state agencies worked quickly to scale up the emergency response, clean up the spill, mount a large-scale effort to assess the injuries to wildlife and other natural resources, and record how these lost resources adversely affected the public.

Deepwater Horizon: Response in the Midst of an Historic Crisis

Posted Mon, 04/03/2017 - 14:18

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill began on April 20, 2010, with a blowout of BP’s Macondo drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the death of 11 men, the spill resulted in the largest mobilization of resources addressing an environmental emergency in the history of the United States.

The size of the spill required the Emergency Response Division to refine tracking subsurface oil, flowrate calculations, and long-term oil transport modeling. Data and information management became a paramount issue. NOAA’s web-based environmental management mapping tool proved invaluable in tracking and sharing data across the many teams and command posts.

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Data: New Monitoring Updates
By Alexis Baldera
alyssa.dillon Tue, 12/20/2016 - 18:52

The 2010 Deepwater oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico revealed a challenge with the way scientific monitoring information is shared and stored.

At the time, the scientific records of monitoring efforts in the Gulf of Mexico were dispersed across many entities from universities, natural resource management agencies, private industries to non-governmental organizations. In most cases monitoring systems were developed independently, often narrowed to specific questions, such as how many oysters should be harvested and how many should be left in the water?

How Does NOAA Model Oil Spills?

Posted Wed, 05/11/2016 - 19:09

One foggy morning in 2007, a cargo ship was gliding across the gray waters of San Francisco Bay when it ran into trouble, quite literally. This ship, the M/V Cosco Busan, struck the Bay Bridge, tearing a hundred-foot-long gash in its hull and releasing 53,000 gallons of thick, sticky fuel oil into the bay.