Monthly Archives February 2019

5 Ways OR&R Shows Our Love For the Ocean

Posted Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:34
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Valentine's Day is a time to express love of all kinds, and nobody deserves a Valentine more than our ocean.

From providing us with food, oxygen, industry, and recreational opportunities, to hosting a rich diversity of life, the oceans show their love for us every single day. The ocean is a real catch.

So let’s take a break from this love letter to talk about five ways we show our love for the ocean here at NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration.

When You Can’t Look, Listen: How Passive Acoustic Monitoring Can Locate Whales After Oil Spills

Posted Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:06
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Listen, the ocean is full of sound. From the tip-tap of scuttling shellfish, to the echoing songs of baleen whales, many kinds of marine life use sound to navigate their underwater world. For scientists, it’s sometimes easier to hear marine creatures than it is to see them.

December 2018 and January 2019 Incident Responses

Posted Fri, 02/08/2019 - 13:53

Every month our Emergency Response Division provides scientific expertise and services to the U.S. Coast Guard on everything from running oil spill trajectories to model where the spill may spread, to possible effects on wildlife and fisheries, and estimates on how long the oil may stay in the environment.

OR&R responded to 11 incidents in December and five incidents in January, including oil discharges, sunken vessels, and a wellhead leak.

20 Years Ago: The Grounded Freighter That Never Reached its Destination

Posted Mon, 02/04/2019 - 14:29
By Doug Helton, Office of Response and Restoration

Twenty years ago, on Feb. 4, 1999, the 639 foot freighter New Carissa ran aground near Coos Bay, Oregon. The ship was destined to load wood chips to carry to Japan, but nature had another plan. The unladen freighter, riding high in the water (and therefore a huge sail area) dragged anchor. Attempts to get the vessel underway and back to sea failed and the swells and high winds drove the ship ashore.