Posts tagged with

pollution

Three Ways You Can Reduce Your Household's Pollution Footprint

Posted Fri, 07/30/2021 - 15:48

This week, we’re taking a look at the different types of urban industrial pollution, how NOAA responds to pollution events and aids in the recovery of natural resources lost due to pollution, and what you can do to help keep pollution out of your waterway. Stay tuned as we explore these topics through a series of blogs. In our latest blog, NOAA’s Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant pollution prevention extension specialist Sarah Zack shares tips for how to reduce your household pollution footprint.

The Value of Urban Waterways

Posted Wed, 07/28/2021 - 13:27
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

You might be surprised to learn what swims through America’s cities. Even waterways with a history of pollution are full of life and are vital parts of local communities. Coastal Superfund sites, where hazardous waste contaminates the environment, are one of the key sources of pollution for many urban waterways. Many American cities sprang up around waterways because they provide opportunities for transportation, trade, and industry. Unfortunately, many of these industries also release contaminants into the environment—where they can linger for decades.

Marine Debris Close to Home: Cleaning Up Our Urban Shores and Waterways

Posted Tue, 07/27/2021 - 12:54
By Ya'el Seid-Green, Office of Response and Restoration Marine Debris Program

When you think about a trip to the beach, do you picture an idyllic island somewhere far away or a city park a few feet away from a busy commercial or residential district? The coastal urban environment is an important place for people to enjoy a little bit of nature, and equally valuable for the animals and plants that make it their home. However, with people comes trash, and coastal areas close to large population centers can face a heavy burden of marine debris. The NOAA Marine Debris Program works with partners across the nation to prevent and remove marine debris in urban areas.

A Look at Oil Spills in Urban Centers

Posted Mon, 07/26/2021 - 15:16
By Donna L. Roberts, Office of Response and Restoration

What’s different about spills in urban environments? When we hear or read about an oil spill, we often envision thick oil sullying a wilderness or open ocean environment—but most spills occur in more urban areas, where oil terminals, refineries, ports and marinas, or rail facilities are situated. 

Communicating Risk Around Climate Change

Posted Tue, 03/30/2021 - 12:23
By Donna McCaskill, NOAA Office for Coastal Management

Over the next two weeks, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this guest blog from NOAA's Office for Coastal Management, learn more about the importance of risk communications in the climate crisis. 

How to Reduce Your Oil Consumption, Without Ditching Your Car

Posted Fri, 07/24/2020 - 06:11
By Alyssa Gray, Office of Response and Restoration

At NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration, we respond to oil spills both big and small — from the millions of barrels of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, to spills of a few barrels released from minor vessel accidents that happen every month. But oil is entering America’s coasts and waterways on a daily basis through another means of pollution — oil runoff.

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Point vs. Non-Point Water Pollution: What’s the Difference?

Posted Fri, 06/05/2020 - 14:00

Water pollution comes in many forms, from toxic chemicals to trash. The sources of water pollution are also varied, from factories to drain pipes. In general, NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) classifies water pollution into two categories; point source and non-point source pollution.

A Whale of Information from a Single Shot: Studying Marine Mammals After Oil Spills Using Remote Biopsy

Posted Mon, 02/10/2020 - 16:32
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

As the vessel speeds through the icy water in pursuit of whales, one researcher cocks and loads a crossbow, waiting for a dorsal fin to surface and the perfect time to strike. It’s a scene reminiscent of America’s maritime past, when commercialized whalers harpooned whales from wooden rowboats to harvest their oils and bones. Industrial whaling nearly wiped out some of America's whales, but today when scientists approach marine mammals such as whales and dolphins in small boats, they are on the hunt for information that helps protect them.

More Than Two Decades Later, Have Killer Whales Recovered from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill?

Posted Mon, 02/10/2020 - 14:36

Does a killer whale instinctively know how to avoid oil spilled on the surface of its watery home? At the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill 23 years ago, scientists and oil spill experts presumed that the answer was "yes."