Posts tagged with

Rivers

Rivers of the 'Dammed,' Rising from the Grave

Posted Thu, 10/31/2019 - 15:32
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

*A Halloween Spooky Science Story 

Once there were six waterways cursed by pollution. 

But terrifying toxins and oozing oil spills were not the first dooms to befall these rivers, each of them had already been dammed. The dams had been constructed for a variety of important reasons, but as the years passed and they fell out of use, an evil crept over them. 

Homewaters: Exploring Waterways that Inspire, from Florida to Ireland

Posted Thu, 10/24/2019 - 19:24

Everyone at NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration plays a crucial role in our mission. For many of us, our journey into the marine world can be traced back to a special place that first sparked a love of water and wild places. This first installment of our new monthly series “Homewaters” explores some of the waters that kindled a passion that would go on to last a lifetime.

Story Map Now Live: NOAA Intern Looks Back on Summer Spent Learning About the Lower Duwamish River

Posted Thu, 07/11/2019 - 12:25
By Kavya Varkey, OR&R 2018 Summer Intern

This blog was written by Kavya Varkey, a high school student from the Seattle area who interned with OR&R in the summer of 2018. Kavya was instrumental in developing the new story map on the Lower Duwamish River Superfund site. An urban river with a history of industrial pollution that began in the 1900s, the Lower Duwamish River continues to undergo both cleanup and restoration efforts. To learn more, view the new story map here

The Anacostia River: Challenges and Opportunities for Outdoor Recreation in the Heart of Washington, DC
By Erin Garnass-Holmes, ambassador to the Anacostia Watershed Urban Waters Partnership
alyssa.dillon Thu, 06/06/2019 - 14:34

The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., was a poster child for America’s degraded urban waterways. Years of industrial land use on the waterfront and floating trash scared many people away from recreating on or by the river. However, in recent years local advocates, government agencies, and water utilities have made great strides in restoring this urban river

Coordination is Key: Moving toward restoration at the St. Louis River Interlake/Duluth Tar site
Annie Gibbs, NOAA Office of Response and Restoration
alyssa.dillon Thu, 03/15/2018 - 18:54

The St. Louis River/Interlake/Duluth Tar site was used for a variety of industrial purposes — including coking plants, tar and chemical companies, the production of pig iron, meat-packing, and as a rail to truck transfer point for bulk commodities — starting near the turn of the 19th century. In 1983, the St. Louis River Superfund site was added to the National Priorities List.  

In November of last year, a settlement was reached between the trustees for the site and the parties responsible for the contamination. The settlement includes funds for the following restoration projects ...

As Assessment Phase Comes to a Close, OR&R Scientist Looks Back on Nearly a Decade of Work on Sheboygan River and Harbor Superfund Site
By Alyssa Gray, NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration
alyssa.dillon Tue, 03/13/2018 - 11:53

The story behind the Sheboygan River and Harbor Superfund site began in the 1870s, when growing industrial activity along the river led to a release of contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

In 1979, the State of Wisconsin began advising the public against eating any resident species from the Sheboygan River, and only limited consumption of fish species from Lake Michigan, where the Sheboygan empties.

How Do You Begin to Clean up a Century of Pollution on New Jersey’s Passaic River? alyssa.dillon Tue, 05/31/2016 - 18:49

Dozens of companies share responsibility for the industrial pollution on New Jersey’s Passaic River, and several Superfund sites dot the lower portion of the river. But one of the perhaps best-known of these companies (and Superfund sites) is Diamond Alkali.