Posts tagged with

Assessment and Restoration Division

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Physical Scientist Ben Shorr

Posted Tue, 06/18/2019 - 18:16
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Ben Shorr, a physical scientist in OR&R’s Assessment and Restoration Division.

Threats to Sea Turtles from Oil Spills: Lessons Learned During a Disaster

Posted Tue, 06/11/2019 - 18:16
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Few animals capture the human imagination like sea turtles. Sea turtles are living fossils, they have glided through the Earth’s oceans for over 110 million years. But today, sea turtles face new, human-caused threats that put all seven species at risk of extinction. One of these threats is oil spills.

The Anacostia River: Challenges and Opportunities for Outdoor Recreation in the Heart of Washington, DC

Posted Thu, 06/06/2019 - 14:34
By Erin Garnass-Holmes, ambassador to the Anacostia Watershed Urban Waters Partnership

The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., was a poster child for America’s degraded urban waterways. Years of industrial land use on the waterfront and floating trash scared many people away from recreating on or by the river. However, in recent years local advocates, government agencies, and water utilities have made great strides in restoring this urban river

Assessing and Restoring the Damage Left Behind by Abandoned and Derelict Vessels

Posted Wed, 05/22/2019 - 20:24

During National Safe Boating Week (May 18-24), NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration is taking a closer look at the anatomy of abandoned and derelict vessels.

An abandoned or derelict vessel (ADV) can be a pollution risk, and depending on the size of the vessel, could result in a pretty massive spill of oil, chemicals, or other hazardous materials. But even without a spill, the vessel itself can damage the environment.

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Environmental Economist Jason Murray

Posted Tue, 03/26/2019 - 12:57
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Jason Murray, an environmental economist in OR&R’s Assessment and Restoration Division.

When You Can’t Look, Listen: How Passive Acoustic Monitoring Can Locate Whales After Oil Spills

Posted Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:06
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Listen, the ocean is full of sound. From the tip-tap of scuttling shellfish, to the echoing songs of baleen whales, many kinds of marine life use sound to navigate their underwater world. For scientists, it’s sometimes easier to hear marine creatures than it is to see them.

Spotlight on the Northeast: The Hudson-Raritan Estuary, an Urban Ecosystem on the Rebound

Posted Wed, 11/28/2018 - 13:07
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

Walking the busy streets of Manhattan, it’s easy to overlook the Hudson River as a living ecosystem, or think about its natural history. The Iroquois people native to the area called the Hudson Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk — "river that flows two ways" — a nod to the twice-daily pulse of the tides. Estuaries, where freshwater rivers meet the saltwater ocean, are some of the most productive, important, and impacted environments on the planet. 

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Marine Scientist Kevin Kirsch

Posted Fri, 10/26/2018 - 13:43
By Alyssa Gray, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). This month’s featured scientist is Assessment and Restoration Division Southeast Branch Manager Kevin Kirsch.

Blowing up Bloede Dam: Patapsco River Resumes Natural Course for First Time in 112 Years

Posted Tue, 10/02/2018 - 12:34
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration Assessment and Restoration Division

On Sept. 14, 2018 NOAA and project partners took an explosive step in the Bloede Dam project. Following 10 years of planning, and three weeks after partners celebrated, the explosives were detonated. Immediately the dam was breached. Water and sediment began pouring over the giant structure. Any lingering concrete will be manually removed. The Bloede Dam removal was the largest and most complicated in NOAA’s history, and a major victory for communities along the Patapsco River.

NOAA Summer Intern Produces Story Map on Hazardous Waste Site Near Seattle

Posted Wed, 09/12/2018 - 13:44
By Vicki Loe, NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration

Washington resident Kavya Varkey joined NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration for an internship this summer at the NOAA Western Regional Center in Seattle. A senior this year at Sammamish High School in Bellevue, Washington, Kavya says she’s always been drawn to science. Her interest has continued to develop and come into focus, and she plans to pursue an education that will lead to a career in environmental science.