Posts tagged with

Restoration

The Nation's Founding Fish Returns to America's Most Historic Small Watershed

Posted Wed, 07/28/2021 - 23:18
By: Gerald McAdams Kauffman, Director of the University of Delaware Water Resources Center, Brandywine Conservancy

In this guest blog from the Brandywine Conservancy by guest author Gerald McAdams Kauffman, director of the University of Delaware Water Resources Center, learn more about the restoration efforts that led to the return of the nation's founding fish to our most historic watershed. (This blog was originally published by the Brandywine Conservancy on June 6, 2020). 

Restoration for the Rising Tide

Posted Fri, 04/09/2021 - 13:19
By Megan Ewald, Office of Response and Restoration

This week, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this blog, learn more about the different types of restoration used to help recover from and mitigate the impacts of severe storm events, and coastal pollution. 

Living Shorelines: A Sound Investment

Posted Thu, 04/01/2021 - 14:09
By Daniel Hayden, Restore America’s Estuaries

Over the next two weeks, we’re sharing some of the ways NOAA monitors and predicts, responds to, and prepares for the impacts of climate change. In this guest blog from Restore America's Estuaries President and CEO Daniel Hayden, learn more about how living shorelines can be used to help protect against the impacts of sea level rise and coastal erosion.

Living Shorelines Help to Protect Coastal Communities from Impacts of Hurricanes

Posted Tue, 02/02/2021 - 07:20
By Leigh Habegger, Restore America’s Estuaries

By the second half of this century, more than half of the world’s population will live within 100 kilometers of a coastline. Maybe that’s not a startling fact for some, but when you stop to consider this in light of sea level rise, the predicted increased storm intensity and frequency, and other coastal hazards associated with heavy development, that’s putting nearly 4 billion people at risk. In the U.S. alone, approximately 163 million people could be impacted!

 

Oyster Reefs Breathe New Life into Virginia’s Elizabeth River

Posted Wed, 08/12/2020 - 13:08
By Megan Ewald and Simeon Hahn, Office of Response and Restoration Assessment and Restoration Division

If you ever wondered how oyster reefs are built, it involves a team of dedicated experts and a water cannon. Over the last month, barges have blasted 100,000 bushels of small fossilized oyster shells, called oyster hash, into the Eastern Branch of Virginia’s Elizabeth River. Oyster hash is normally shipped abroad for use as chicken feed, but now it’s laying the foundation for a restoration project that will help the river recover from pollution.

Point vs. Non-Point Water Pollution: What’s the Difference?

Posted Fri, 06/05/2020 - 14:00

Water pollution comes in many forms, from toxic chemicals to trash. The sources of water pollution are also varied, from factories to drain pipes. In general, NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) classifies water pollution into two categories; point source and non-point source pollution.

Assessing the Impacts from Deepwater Horizon

Posted Sat, 04/04/2020 - 16:57

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster spread spilled oil deep into the ocean’s depths and along the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, compromising the complex ecosystem and local economies. The response and the natural resources damage assessment were the largest in the nation’s history. In this 2017 blog, learn more about the natural resources injured by the Deepwater Horizon spill, and how our team assessed those injuries. 

Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Coastal Salt Marsh Habitat

Posted Fri, 04/03/2020 - 08:12
By Mary Baker, Office of Response and Restoration

The 2010 explosion on the DeepwaterHorizon Macondo oil well drilling platform triggered a massive oil release polluting over 1,300 miles of shoreline along the Gulf of Mexico. The harm from the spill to coastal salt marsh habitat was extensive, and in some instances, permanent. NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration along with other federal and state agencies measured the spill’s effects and created a restoration plan as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA).

Deepwater Horizon: Response in the Midst of an Historic Crisis

Posted Mon, 03/30/2020 - 12:00

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill began on April 20, 2010, with a blowout of BP’s Macondo drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the death of 11 men, the spill resulted in the largest mobilization of resources addressing an environmental emergency in the history of the United States. The size of the spill required the Emergency Response Division to refine tracking subsurface oil, flowrate calculations, and long-term oil transport modeling. Data and information management became a paramount issue ...