NOAA Makes Data on Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Plume Available Online

Posted Sun, 04/05/2020 - 18:40

From March 30 to April 20, tune in as we go back in time to the day of our country’s largest marine oil spill, what’s happened since then, and how we’re better prepared for future spills. In this 2013 blog, learn more about how integral data collection and management was during the damage assessment.

Assessing the Impacts from Deepwater Horizon

Posted Sat, 04/04/2020 - 16:57

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster spread spilled oil deep into the ocean’s depths and along the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, compromising the complex ecosystem and local economies. The response and the natural resources damage assessment were the largest in the nation’s history. In this 2017 blog, learn more about the natural resources injured by the Deepwater Horizon spill, and how our team assessed those injuries. 

Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Coastal Salt Marsh Habitat

Posted Fri, 04/03/2020 - 08:12
By Mary Baker, Office of Response and Restoration

The 2010 explosion on the DeepwaterHorizon Macondo oil well drilling platform triggered a massive oil release polluting over 1,300 miles of shoreline along the Gulf of Mexico. The harm from the spill to coastal salt marsh habitat was extensive, and in some instances, permanent. NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration along with other federal and state agencies measured the spill’s effects and created a restoration plan as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA).

In Mapping the Fallout from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Developing One Tool to Bring Unity to the Response

Posted Thu, 04/02/2020 - 12:06
By Katie Wagner, Amy Merten, and Michele Jacobi, Office of Response and Restoration

From March 30 to April 20, tune in as we go back in time to the day of our country’s largest marine oil spill, what’s happened since then, and how we’re better prepared for future spills. In this 2015 blog, take a look at how one tool helped responders to map the "organized chaos" of the spill. 

Attempting to Answer One Question Over and Over Again: Where Will the Oil Go?

Posted Wed, 04/01/2020 - 16:45
By Doug Helton, Office of Response and Restoration

Oil spills raise all sorts of scientific questions, and NOAA's job is to help answer them. We have a saying that each oil spill is unique, but there is one question we get after almost every spill: Where will the oil go? One of our primary scientific products during a spill is a trajectory forecast, which often takes the form of a map showing where the oil is likely to travel and which shorelines and other environmentally or culturally sensitive areas might be at risk ... 

Deepwater Horizon: Response in the Midst of an Historic Crisis

Posted Mon, 03/30/2020 - 12:00

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill began on April 20, 2010, with a blowout of BP’s Macondo drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the death of 11 men, the spill resulted in the largest mobilization of resources addressing an environmental emergency in the history of the United States. The size of the spill required the Emergency Response Division to refine tracking subsurface oil, flowrate calculations, and long-term oil transport modeling. Data and information management became a paramount issue ...

Minds Behind OR&R: Meet Scientific Support Coordinator Steve Lehmann

Posted Thu, 03/26/2020 - 19:11
By Vicki Loe, Office of Response and Restoration

This feature is part of a monthly series profiling scientists and technicians who provide exemplary contributions to the mission of NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R). In this month’s feature meet Steve Lehmann, a scientific support coordinator with OR&R’s Emergency Response Division.

Partnership with University of New Hampshire Yields Results and a New Generation of Oil Spill Scientists

Posted Wed, 03/18/2020 - 11:18
By Steve Lehmann, Office of Response and Restoration

It is true that a sports car represents the apex of transportation engineering, but that sometimes a horse is the right tool for the job. New ideas come from new minds. For the past several years, oil spill response experts from NOAA’s Office of Response and Restoration have been working with undergraduates in the environmental engineering program at the University of New Hampshire to examine simple answers to a complex problem.