Posts tagged with

disaster preparedness

Facility Improvements Enhance Operation and Function at the NOAA Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center

Posted Tue, 12/22/2020 - 18:03
By Jessica White, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

The NOAA Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center, operated by the Office of Response and Restoration, is a multi-purpose facility located in Mobile, Alabama, which serves NOAA and our partners to enhance preparedness for and support response to all hazards. Established in 2012, the center is strategically equipped with office space, a large space for emergency operations or training events, conference rooms, break out rooms, a lactation room, showers, a loading dock/receiving area, and boat barn. These spaces are built to withstand up to Category 5 hurricane winds and are wired to maintain internet access and power during and after a disaster. 

Disaster Preparedness Program 2020 Year in Review

Posted Fri, 11/20/2020 - 14:34
By Kate Wheelock, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

The year 2020 has certainly tested us all. It provided a wide and deep array of real-life events for us to address, respond to, and learn from. For the National Ocean Service (NOS) Disaster Preparedness Program (DPP), our ability to maintain our emergency response focus and adapt to the constraints of physical distancing was tested. Here’s a short recap of some of the successes that the DPP and our partners accomplished during the trying conditions of fiscal year 2020 ...

Earthquake Preparedness: Can Being Ready for One Disaster Better Prepare Us for Another?

Posted Wed, 10/28/2020 - 15:24
By Savannah Turner, Office of Response and Restoration

Philosophers, spiritual leaders, poets, novelists, and a variety of other historical thinkers have long attempted to define the concept of wisdom. Research on the subject alludes to the wise as being decision makers who tend to possess humility, strong cognitive capacity, reflection and compassion. I am grateful for the sage in my life, my grandmother, who at 96 years old continues to be one of the most resilient individuals I have ever known. She has always said that being ready for one kind of disaster will inadvertently help us be better prepared for another. I think that adage is relevant for us all, regardless of whether you live in the Gulf and focus on hurricane preparedness, or live along the Cascadia subduction zone in Washington state. 

After the Storm: Supporting Disaster Recovery

Posted Fri, 09/25/2020 - 11:37
By Autumn Lotze, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

As we navigate through peak hurricane season while continuing to deal with the impacts of a catastrophic wildfire season and ongoing public health risks, disaster readiness and response are front and center for many agencies, NOAA included. But preparing for anticipated impacts and responding to immediate needs within the scope of NOAA’s mission areas represent only part of NOAA’s activity when it comes to disasters. NOAA and the National Ocean Service (NOS) also play a critical role in supporting long term recovery.

The Power of Community Preparedness

Posted Wed, 09/16/2020 - 13:37
By Katie Krushinski, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

In times of the disaster, the old adage says, “The first 72 hours are on you.” Sure, we buy non-perishable foods and gallons of water, stock up on batteries, and fill our gas tanks before a potential hurricane landfall. We monitor the weather watches and warnings and relocate to our safe place when tornadoes or wildfires threaten. We know what preparedness measures to take. But, do we understand what it means to have to take care of ourselves for the first 72 hours before professional help can get to us? 

Growing up Prepared: The Power of Youth Preparedness

Posted Tue, 09/01/2020 - 23:32
By Kimberly Page Albins and Alyson Finn, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

September is National Preparedness Month, and we at the Disaster Preparedness Program understand that disasters can happen at any time, often without warning. They affect everyone in a community, including children. Children make up roughly a quarter of the U.S. population; and emergency planning, response, and recovery efforts must consider the unique needs of children of all ages. The best way to ensure children and communities are safe during an emergency is to help them prepare before a disaster occurs. 

Lightning Safety Awareness: A Threat to Lives and Infrastructure 

Posted Tue, 07/14/2020 - 23:08
By Savannah Turner,  NOAA Office of Response and Restoration

While warmer weather motivates us to spend more time outdoors, it also gives rise to ideal atmospheric conditions that generate thunderstorms and lightning. So, even though the 2020 hurricane season remains in the forefront, the Disaster Preparedness Program also encourages you to remain cognizant of additional seasonal hazards, such as lightning. 

Be Prepared When Wildfires Threaten

Posted Tue, 07/07/2020 - 00:37
By Charles Grisafi, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

Wildfires can happen anywhere and anytime, as we’ve seen with recent wildfires across the country, from the Florida Everglades to the coast of California. A wildfire is an unplanned fire often caused by humans or lightning, that starts to burn in a natural area, with risk increasing in periods of little rain and high winds. Though the Office of Response and Restoration does not respond to wildfires, it’s critical that both OR&R and the National Ocean Service are prepared for the threats that wildfires can pose to our mission critical operations and personnel.

Essential Functions: What Makes Them Essential?

Posted Tue, 06/30/2020 - 20:59
By Alyson Finn, Office of Response and Restoration Disaster Preparedness Program

Everyday, organizations, communities, and government institutions provide critical services that are essential to our everyday life. But what would happen if we didn’t have access to these services? What would life be like? Hospitals, banks and grocery stores all provide essential services that we, the American people, depend on. The ability to continually perform such services is an important component of resilience and requires extensive continuity planning.